Product Questions

The V4 is the pogo stick that most people will probably benefit from. It is designed to deliver a soft, smooth bounce that resembles a portable trampoline. The major difference between our old V3 and the new V4 is that we’ve added 14 additional cubic inches of air to the cylinder. This additional air changes everything. With the V4, you can bounce higher with lower air pressure. This makes it easier to control, faster to learn, and easier to jump high & do tricks. Aside from that, we’ve updated nearly every part on the pogo stick to fix nagging issues that have been troublesome in the past. The result is that the V4 is our newest and most amazing pogo stick. Just like Apple always says – this is the best “insert product here” we’ve ever made. In this case, however, the V4 really is by far the best pogo stick we’ve ever made.

The V4 Pro takes all of the designs put into the V4 and then adds two new benefits. The V4 Pro has a slide shaft with a stroke that is 2” longer than the V4. This longer slide shaft provides extra boost for jumping even higher or landing from greater heights – like when you jump off of something tall. The V4 Pro also has a bushing with about 78% less surface area for less friction. On top of that, the bushing has pockets drilled into it that enable you to add your own lubricant. Once lubricant is added, the bushing will then self-lubricate the shaft while you bounce, providing an even smoother bounce. This bushing coupled with the longer slide shaft make the V4 ideal for serious riders or those looking to get the best we have to give.

The V4 comes in two different colors and three different sizes. The V4 is white. The V4 Pro will come in green.
The two parts that are most likely to wear down and break are the Grip Tip and the Handlebars.

The Grip Tip takes a tremendous beating over its life and wears down like tread on tires. Over time you will need to replace it, and the frequency of replacement depends on how long you use it for. Generally, the Grip Tip should last a year or more.

The handlebars are designed to bend or break for safety reasons. In the event that you drop the pogo stick and it happens to land just right, the handlebars may bend, or after bending enough times, break. This is a safety feature designed into the pogo stick. You can purchase a new Grip Tip or a Handlebar 3-Pack for $20 each.

All other parts are covered under our warranty and are replaced on a less frequent basis.

Yep. Every single part on our pogo sticks can be replaced.

We realize that they go through quite a beating out there in the field. Some people really abuse the heck out of them (cough, cough – our sponsored team riders), and every single component might need to be replaced at some point or another. Because of that, we made sure to design the stick so that everything can be interchangeable quickly and cost effectively.

Replacement parts are available on our website. All parts on the V4 can be quickly replaced at home without the need for sending the pogo stick in for repair.

It’s hard to say exactly what temperatures our sticks can operate at without actually cruising down to Antarctica, but I’m feeling that our chances of surviving each are favorable.

The majority of the V4 is made of 6061 Aluminum or Stainless Steel – no problem there.

The same goes for the nylon that we use for the bushing and piston, each of which can handle -100ºF – 450ºF.

Our urethane parts – shock absorber donuts and our bounce pads – have a more limited temp range, the upper of which is probably about 275ºF, so you’re all good in Death Valley. I wouldn’t leave it sitting in the back seat of the blistering sun. Even though the heats of the desert are fine for bouncing, a stick sitting in the backseat of, say, Phoenix, will for sure hit temps in the 200s (we actually experienced this with some older, cheaper V2 shock donuts; as a result, we changed urethanes to one with a higher temperature range).

The stick itself will generate its own internal heat from the friction. The slide shaft gets pretty hot to the touch, and the cylinder will get warm. This heat generated won’t be anything to lose sleep over…and in the snowy wastelands, the warm cylinder could potentially act as a source of warmth when held tight.

My biggest worry would be the Antarctic climate. At those brisk temps the rubber o-ring would constrict a little bit and would be likely to leak air a little bit. The grip tip urethane could also start to become pretty rock hard and would have a tough time gripping the ground. If you have enough soft snowpack, who knows, you might actually be just fine with grip. On cement however…

We have customers pretty far north in Canada (eh), and they don’t seem to have issues with the freezing cold aside from their bodies not really being able to handle it.

The urethane grip tip should last you a year or more, but it really depends on how often you use them. Our team riders replace them every 6 months or so, but they use them just about every day and under some pretty harsh conditions. Eventually they will wear down and need to be replaced. We make them as strong as we can, but they can only withstand so much abuse before wearing down…much like tread on a tire. Replacing a grip tip takes about 1-2 minutes.

Handlebars are likely to bend and eventually break. Some people order replacement packs from us and others choose to purchase their own replacement rod and cut it to size themselves. We could easily make the bars out of steel so that they don’t bend, but we need to leave them soft for safety reasons…a lot of our customers do tricks where they take their feet off the pogo stick and put them back on at the last second. If they happen to miss the pegs with their feet and their face hits the handlebars, we’d rather the handlebars bend than their face break. Replacing handlebars takes about two minutes.

Yes and no.

While it is technically possible to turn a V3 into a V4, the process of doing so requires almost every part to be switched out except for the cylinder, handlebars, top cap, softop, and shaft…although you would need to drill some new holes into the cylinder to make it work as a V4.

So the answer is yes, but it would also be expensive because of all the new parts required. The cost for an upgrade kit would be $150 plus shipping.

Yes, totally! And if you do, please send us a picture showing off your new custom stick.

It’s a pretty simple process:

  1. Sand down the original coating. You’ll need to roughen up the cylinder in order to give the spray paint something to stick to.
  2. Tape the very top of the stick off where for handlebars sit. You don’t want to get paint in those four bolt holes.
  3. Create a 5 foot by 5 foot flat space on the floor and cover with cardboard or paper. Make sure the space is really well ventilated. The spray paint will probably end up all over.
  4. Spray a white or light gray primer over the original powder coat until most of the color is covered up.
  5. Sand gently with a a 400 grit sandpaper to smooth the primer.
  6. Give it a few good coats of spray paint.
  7. OPTIONAL: Sand very gently with 800 grit sandpaper to remove dust or particles sticking to the paint.
  8. Give it a few clear coats to protect it and keep it from rubbing off on your clothes.

Usage Questions

How high you can jump really depends on your own athletic ability. Can you dunk a basketball? If so, you’ll probably be able to get on the V4 and fly…although it’ll take practice before you’re able to or even ready to jump high. If you’re not very coordinated or athletic, you will have a much harder time jumping high than someone who is. With enough practice, just about everyone should be able to jump 5′ or higher. The best of the best will be able to go 9′-10′ once they get really, really good on it. The current world record is shared by three people and it is 10 feet 6 inches up and over a bar.
You can use a standard Schrader valve bike pump or air compressor to pump it up.
Our V4 can hold air for several days to weeks at a time depending on how you use it and what air pressure it is being used at. The more air pressure you put into it, the better it will hold air.

If you’re using, say 60 psi and aren’t doing a bunch of crazy tricks, you can probably jump on the same air for a week. If you’re doing a bunch of tricks, however, you’ll probably want to adjust the air pressure up and down for the different stuff that you do.

With a low air pressure, you might need to pump the V4 up daily. With a really low pressure (30 psi and below) you might need to pump the V4 up on a daily basis.

We don’t recommend using less than 30 psi because the lower the air pressure the easier it is for air to escape, meaning you may have to pump it up more often. We recommend starting with 1/4 of your body weight in pounds (1/2 in kilograms). If you weigh 200 pounds, for example, you would want to start with around 50 psi in the V4. As you get better and more comfortable, you can pump more air into the V4, which will stiffen the spring and let you jump higher.
The air spring is based on the psi that the V4 is pumped up to. More air (higher psi) creates a stiffer spring. Less air (lower psi) creates a softer spring.
All you need to do is add air or release air depending on who is bouncing.
We recommend a 75 pound weight limit on the lower end. There is no maximum weight limit. The V4 has a burst capacity of over 2,000 psi. This means that someone would need to pump 650 psi into the cylinder and then be able to fully compress it to put the cylinder in jeopardy…doing so would mean being able to jump onto buildings and just isn’t possible with any human weight or strength – instead we recommend that customers gauge their own abilities. If you weigh 400 pounds the V4 can handle you…but can you handle it?
We don’t recommend using less than 30 psi because the lower the air pressure the easier it is for air to escape, meaning you may have to pump it up more often if you only plan on using it at 25 psi.
When you release the air from the V4, the shaft and Grip Tip collapse into the cylinder for easy transport. When you pump it up again, they pop right back out.
There’s no max air pressure that you can pump into our pogo sticks and still be able to physically bounce on it. When the world record jump of 10.6 feet was set on the V4 Pro, it was pumped up to around 120psi. That means that at full compression the pogo stick only reached around 360 psi to jump over 10 feet high..

The burst pressure of the cylinder is about 2,000 psi, so you can fill it to your heart’s content and not have to worry about it.

Yep. I leave mine pumped up all the time and have never noticed any problems because of it.
The V4 is made from waterproof materials, so you can take it into the water with you, whether that’s jumping into a pool or off a bridge and into water. The only thing you would notice from water getting onto the stick are that the 8 cylinder bolts will rust since they’re a black anodized steel. They’ll still perform just fine, though.

If you’re jumping into a pool, make sure not to jump on any wet areas. Those spots will be extremely slippery and could cause you to slip and get hurt.

Where we’re going, we don’t need roads. The V4 can be used a different types of surfaces so long as they are hard and dry. Grass feels nice and soft to bounce in, but you risk the chance of putting holes all over the place…and if you hit a spot with wet dirt or mud you’re going to put a hole in the ground. Many people who use our pogo sticks in their backyards like to jump on a sheet of plywood. Aside from concrete and grass you can bounce on wood floors, laminate, cement, asphalt and other surfaces that won’t break or cause you to slip. You SHOULD NOT jump on anything that is wet or soft. Stay away from gravel, mud, sand, and really dirty environments.
We don’t recommend bouncing on hills. Steep hills are a definite no no. Very, VERY mild hills are probably ok, but make sure you’re very confident in your skills before trying to attempt bouncing on a hill.
Skate parks can be really fun on a V4, but you need to be aware of landing on angled surfaces like ramps. Doing so can result in slipping out and can be dangerous. If you do take the V4 to a skate park, do not jump onto any of the steep ramps…instead, jump over them! Some skate parks allow pogo sticks, and some do not. It usually depends on who is monitoring the park.
There are a few options you can choose in the winter:
1. Grass, but be careful…if the conditions are right, this can be super duper dangerous. Sometimes a layer of unfrozen ground develops above another layer of permafrost. This creates a slip and slide effect that’ll leave you on your back. Check the grass to make sure there’s no frozen ground underneath before jumping.
2. You can try contacting a few gyms and asking about their floors. Our pogo sticks will break through a tumble floor but if there is blue padded floor on concrete it’s awesome. In general, just make sure not to jump on anything hollow.
3. If you can find some turf that would be great. Indoor soccer arenas are good if they’ll allow you to use it in off hours, or outdoor ones without snow cover are good as well.
4. In some rainy states like the Pacific Northwest, there are tons of covered basketball courts at schools. Not sure if you have anything like that nearby.

Issues

Once the fill valve is rounded off, it’s pretty much stuck in there. We can remove it at our shop using some oil, a blow torch, and a screw extractor, but I wouldn’t recommend trying that unless you’re pretty handy with tools.

If only the nut is messed up and the valve is still in good shape, there are still two options for adding lube:
Use a core removal tool to take the core out of the valve and then pour the lubricant right through the valve itself. We usually don’t recommend this because people oftentimes forget to remove the air pressure from the cylinder before taking the valve out. If there is any air pressure left in the cylinder and you unscrew the core, it will shoot out and be very difficult to find.
Add lubricant by taking the pegs out and pouring some lube into the cylinder

If you want, we can always remove it from the cylinder and replace it with a new one for you.

We designed our pogo sticks to have 8 bolts connecting the cylinder and footpegs because we knew that people would lose some of the bolts. You can continue to bounce on it with 5 bolts without worry of damaging the cylinder (elongating the holes). If you end up with less than 5, you’ll definitely need to get more.

We can always send them out.

The oil leaking out of the breather holes is a normal process. Every time you jump and the piston goes up into the cylinder some of the oil residue is left on the cylinder walls.

When the piston comes back down again it scrapes that lubricant back down into the bottom of the stick, where it builds up and drains out of either the breather holes or down through the bushing and onto the shaft. We’ve been working on trying to figure out a completely enclosed system that holds the lubricant in while also preventing dirt from getting into the cylinder, but it’s proven to be a really tricky process. Sooner or later we’ll figure it out, but until that point the oil will leak out of the stick and need to be replaced from time to time.

As long as it’s holding air, you’re good to go.

Our pogo sticks use high quality metals and plastics. The o-ring is made from Buna rubber, so it’s pretty impervious to different chemicals. Because of that you can use pretty much any kind of oil or lubricant that you want.

From past experience we’ve learned that Vaseline, Baby Oil Gel, and White Lithium Grease typically provide the smoothest bounce.

You’re free to experiment with other lubricants – and if you find one that you think works better, definitely let us know! There are a couple of things we look for in a lubricant:
Something that’s in the middle of thick and runny. If it’s too runny, like Baby Oil, it will tend to leak out of the stick really quickly and make a mess…although it’s crazy smooth. On the flip side, if the lube that you try is too thick, it’ll make for a slow and difficult bounce.
Somewhat clean. If you get motor oil, it’ll be pretty smooth but it’ll make a mess because it’s just…more dirty.

Model Comparisons

The V4 is our newest pogo stick design, which replaces the 2010 V3 design. The V4 delivers a soft, smooth bounce that resembles a portable trampoline. The major difference between our old V3 and the new V4 is that we’ve added 14 additional cubic inches of air to the cylinder. This additional air changes everything. With the V4, you can bounce higher with lower air pressure. This makes it easier to control, faster to learn, and easier to jump high & do tricks. Aside from that, we’ve updated nearly every part on the pogo stick to fix nagging issues that have been troublesome in the past. The result is that the V4 is our newest and most amazing pogo stick.

Benefits for Additional Air

Easier to bounce
Bounce higher
Bounce for longer periods of time without getting tired
Reduced rider weight requirements (from 100 pounds down to around 75))

Here’s a list of the parts that have been updated:

New Air Piston takes the place of the previous piston/spacer tower. Because of that, it holds more air, reduces the total number of parts, and makes the pogo stick hold air even better than before
New Shock Donuts will increase air flow, are more quiet, and have a longer lifespan
New Bushings reduce friction by 40% on the V4 and 75% on the Pro
Updated Footpegs are stronger than ever
New Bounce Pads provide supreme grip
4 additional Breather Holes double the air flow
The slide shaft has been shortened to reduce weight, but the actual stroke is still longer than the V3 by 1” on the base model and 3” on the Pro.
All these put together mean that the V4 weighs less and is easier to maneuver.

The V4 Pro Pogo Stick is everything the V4 Pogo Stick is plus a bit more. There are three differences:
It’s green compared to the white V4.
The V4 Pro has a reduced friction, mod-ready bushing. With about 78% less friction than the V4 bushing, it’s smoother right out of the box. We also put ‘lube pockets’ into the bushing so that you can add your own lubricant, which gets trapped between the shaft and bushing, creating a self-lubricated shaft…and an even smoother ride.
The V4 Pro has two additional inches of slide shaft stroke, which come into play when trying to do tricks, jump high, or jump off of things.

The Pro is geared more to the people who are interested in doing tricks, however, it’s smoother overall bounce makes it better for just about any situation—once you get over the fact that it’s 2” higher off the ground.

The V4 Pogo Stick is the most advanced pogo stick ever made, and it’s really difficult to compare to other pogo sticks on the market…it would kind of be like comparing a tricycle to a mountain bike. They’re just made for different things.

Our pogo sticks are made with performance and durability in mind. We make them in the USA with really high tolerances and precision. They’re geared for jumping high, doing tricks, and being serviceable. They withstand a crazy amount of abuse, and in the off chance that a part does break, all of the parts can be replaced. Check out our replacement parts page.

Every other pogo stick out there is designed as either a toy or recreation device. They’re made from cheaper materials and have retail pricing in mind (i.e. production in China, cheaper materials, few replaceable parts, etc). It’s not that other pogo sticks aren’t as good – it’s more that they just aren’t designed to push the limits like our pogo stick is.

So when comparing our V4 pogo sticks to others, keep in mind that our pogo sticks are meants for you to do whatever your heart desires, while others just aren’t meant for jumping higher than a foot or two.

We design our pogo sticks for serious use.

It’s kind of like comparing apples and oranges.

If money is a major factor and you don’t care about jumping high, then Flybar and NSG pogo sticks will probably be just fine.

If you’re looking for high performance, we can promise you one thing: our pogo sticks are well worth the cost.

Safety

Our pogo sticks are deceptively safe. Nobody has ever gotten onto one and jumped 5 feet high. It takes practice, coordination, and balance to build up to that point.

Unlike bikes, skateboards, and snowboards there is very little or even no speed involved while using a pogo stick. Because of that, you can always just ditch the pogo stick and simply land on your feet. For most people, this means landing on your feet from 2-4 feet high. For the crazy extreme sport users out there, that can mean landing on your feet from 5-7 feet off the ground.

As long as you’re not trying to push the limits, you’ll probably be just fine on our pogo stick.

That being said…safety on the V4 is really up to you. We design it to be capable of doing pretty much anything you want on it, whether that’s jumping two feet high or jumping eight feet high and doing flips. As is the case with any extreme sport product, you can definitely get hurt if you push the boundaries.

The design of our pogo stick itself is very safe. It rarely breaks and holds up after getting beat up over and over again…but if you choose to push the limits, you should understand the potential consequences.

Yes. We recommend practicing safe bouncing at all times. We also recommend close-toed shoes…they’re like helmets for your feet.
No! Are you insane???

The only thing connecting you to the ground is the grip tip, which has something like 32 inches in contact with the ground. It difficult enough to keep that tip from slipping in the best of circumstances. Once you introduce water to the equation all bets are off.

When you first get your pogo stick, you’ll barely be able to get more than a foot or two off the ground. If you take a spill at this point, you’ll dust yourself off and laugh about it. It’ll take practice before you get comfortable and are able to jump more than a couple feet. And by that point, you’ll be good enough to avoid bad spills so long as you’re just jumping up and down. The real danger kicks in when you start trying to do the big air tricks (flips, stickflips, tornadoes, Bennett-twister…). When you get to that stage, there is the potential for injury.

THINGS YOU NEED:

Helmets are a must. No matter what! Even when you’re only two feet off the ground you have the potential to very seriously injure yourself if you fall in just the right way.

When looking for a helmet, make sure it’s CSPC Certified. That basically means it’ll definitely save your noggin if you hit it.

Also, any time you take a hard fall and hit your head, it’s time for a new helmet. They are a one and done deal. The foam inside of the helmet cracks and won’t provide the same level of protection again. Many people don’t know that.

Close-toed shoes are essential. They’re like helmets for your feet. Try to jump with sandals, and you’re likely to end up with some bloody toes…and maybe a pinky toe that sticks out sideways.

Gloves can help if you suffer from super sweaty hands (SSH). If you have clammy palms you may want to consider some aftermarket grips or some gloves.

Elbow pads aren’t really needed. It’s not too likely that you’ll fall on your elbows.

Knee Pads don’t generally provide much protection. Unless you’re doing some new trick that puts you in an awkward position in the air, you probably won’t be landing on your knees.

Shin Guards can be helpful for the younguns that are learning to do commitment tricks like barspins. If you miss the pegs and catch a shin, they will save some skin.
There are some common sense rules to follow when it comes to using our pogo sticks. Our safety page discusses the different things you should NOT do. Follow those rules, and you shouldn’t have to worry too much about getting injured.

Definitely use the softop at all times. If you slip or miss the pegs and hit your chin or face on the metal without the softop you’ll need to get some new teeth or even a surgery…we learned the hard way before designing the softop. Brian Spencer, one of the originals still has dentures for his 4 front teeth.

Instead of the o-ring to hold it on you can use a rubber band or one of those elastic bracelets…or use it without the band. It should stay on most of the time without the o-ring.

We always recommend helmets. No matter what! Even when you’re only two feet off the ground you have the potential to very seriously injure yourself if you fall in just the right way.

When looking for a helmet, make sure it’s CSPC Certified. That basically means it’ll definitely save your noggin if you hit it.

Here’s the helmet I usually recommend – it’s stylish and safe: Triple Eight Certified Rubber Helmet and can be found on Amazon.

Also, any time you take a hard fall and hit your head, it’s time for a new helmet. They are a one and done deal. The foam inside of the helmet cracks and won’t provide the same level of protection again. Many people don’t know that.

Like any extreme sport, our pogo sticks can certainly be dangerous. We have guys doing flips over cars on them. If you want to push the limits, you have to accept injuries.

That being said, most people never get to that level, and our sticks are only as dangerous as you want them to be.

When you first get your pogo stick, you’ll barely be able to get more than a foot or two off the ground. If you take a spill at this point, you’ll dust yourself off and laugh about it. It’ll take practice before you get comfortable and are able to jump more than a couple feet. And by that point, you’ll be good enough to avoid bad spills so long as you’re just jumping up and down. The real danger kicks in when you start trying to do the big air tricks (flips, stickflips, tornadoes, Bennett-twister…). When you get to that stage, there is the potential for injury.

We always recommend helmets. No matter what! Even when you’re only two feet off the ground you have the potential to very seriously injure yourself if you fall in just the right way.

When looking for a helmet, make sure it’s CSPC Certified. That basically means it’ll definitely save your noggin if you hit it.

Here’s the helmet I usually recommend – it’s stylish and safe: Triple Eight Certified Rubber Helmet and can be found on Amazon.

Also, any time you take a hard fall and hit your head, it’s time for a new helmet. They are a one and done deal. The foam inside of the helmet cracks and won’t provide the same level of protection again. Many people don’t know that.

Elbow pads are nice too, but not as necessary. It’s not too likely that you’ll fall on your elbows. If you suffer from super sweaty hands (SSH) as we call it, you may want to consider some aftermarket grips or some gloves.

There are some common sense rules to follow when it comes to using our pogo sticks. Our safety page discusses the different things you should NOT do. Follow those rules, and you shouldn’t have to worry too much about getting injured.

Sizes

Small – 4’8″ – 5’3″ (147cm – 161cm) | 10lbs (4.54kg)

Medium – 5’4″ – 5’11” (162cm – 181cm) | 10.5lbs (4.76kg)

Large – 6′ – 6’6″ (182cm – 198cm) | 11lbs (5kg)

There are oftentimes cases where a youngster is a little too short to get the medium pogo stick, but will probably grow to be 5’4″ within six months. In those cases, it would be best to get the larger size pogo stick and grow into it – but only if you will grow into it quickly. Jumping on a size that is too tall for you is more difficult than jumping on a pogo stick that is too short. If you are in between sizes, it’s usually better to go smaller.
It really depends on how tall you are and how tall your kids are. If you’re a foot apart, it will be difficult to share the same pogo stick. Either they will need to jump on your pogo stick that is much too large for them, or you will need to jump on their pogo stick that is much too small for you.

If they’re jumping on your larger pogo stick, they won’t be able to get their upper body over the top of the handle bars, which means their weight will not be centered over the top of the pogo stick. They’ll have a tough time using their weight to compress the air spring, and their weight will be off-center, creating a tendency to jump backwards.

If you jump on their tiny little pogo stick, you’ll need to hunch over and will be uncomfortable.

If you’re going to split the same pogo stick no matter what, I’d determine who is going to use the pogo stick more and probably just go with that size.

It depends.

Are you looking to use it for recreation and exercise, hopping around mostly at lower altitudes? Or are you planning to jump high and do big air tricks?

We have a few Vurtego team riders that are over 6′ tall, but they prefer to bounce on a medium because the smaller size makes it easier to maneuver, and the lighter weight makes it easier to whip around in the air.

However, a large holds about 18″ of extra air volume than a medium, which creates a softer bounce.

The size that you should choose is dependent on what you want to do with the pogo stick. If you’re looking to do lots of tricks, get the medium. If you’re looking for exercise and occasional high jumps, get the large.

You won’t necessarily jump higher on a large than a medium. You will jump highest on the stick that fits your body the best. Just about all of the world height records have been set on a medium because the riders who set the records have always felt more comfortable on a medium.

PROTIP: If you have longer than average legs, the large would probably be ideal
PROTIP: If you’re planning on sharing it with others, about 60% of all of our sales are mediums.

No. The size of the pogo stick does not determine the height that you can jump. The world record for height over a bar (10′) was set on a Medium. Bigger sizes will not help you jump higher because you will have more difficulty centering your weight on top of the pogo stick. It’s very important to be able to bend your upper body over the pogo stick so that you can not only achieve a balanced center of gravity but also push your weight into the bounce to create more lift. Get the size that fits your body best, and you’ll be able to jump higher.
We typically say that there’s a 75 pound limit because we are certain that at that weight anyone really is capable of bouncing. People under 75 pounds will need to have some athleticism and an understanding of timing to be able to use the V4 Pogo Stick. Someone who weighs 150 pounds doesn’t feel much friction in the pogo stick, but someone who weighs 60 pounds will. Because of that, they will need to really be able to time their bounces and jump at the right time in order to use the pogo stick. Some people get this concept and others just don’t. Being able to jump on the V4 Pogo Stick at less than 75 pounds is a case by case basis.

If you weigh 70 pounds and are somewhat athletic, you’ll most likely be fine on our V4. However, there will probably be a slow air leak. In general, the more air pressure you put into the pogo stick the better it holds. 30psi is a threshold where it will tend to leak air when bouncing because there just isn’t enough pressure to form a strong seal. At 70 pounds, you’d probably only use about 20 psi. When using a low psi, every single unit of air matters. 15 psi is 25% less air than 20 psi. You will probably have to refill the stick with a few pumps of air every 30 minutes or so. This will go away as you get heavier and start to use more air.

If you weigh 60 pounds and are pretty dang athletic to jump on the V4. However, there will be a slow air leak. In general, the more air pressure you put into the pogo stick the better it holds. 30psi is threshold where it will tend to leak air when bouncing because there just isn’t enough pressure to form a strong seal. At 60 pounds, you’d probably only use about 18 psi. When using a low psi, every single unit of air matters. 15 psi is almost 20 % less air than 18 psi. You will probably have to refill the stick with a few pumps of air every 20 minutes or so. This will go away as you get heavier and start to use more air.

If you weigh 50 pounds and are really really athletic, you MIGHT be ok on our V4, although we wouldn’t recommend it.

There will definitely be a bit of an air leak. In general, the more air pressure you put into the pogo stick the better it holds. 30psi is threshold where it will tend to leak air when bouncing because there just isn’t enough pressure to form a strong seal. At 50 pounds, you’d probably only use around 13 psi and would need to refill the stick every 10-15 minutes. This would get better and better as you grow.
The pogo stick also weighs 10 pounds, so it would be ⅕ of your bodyweight. It would move you as much as you’d move it.

If you’re growing REALLY fast, then yes, you should get the larger size. If it’s going to be more than 5-6 months before you reach the next height you might want to get the size that fits you now. Using a pogo stick that’s too large for you is pretty tough and not enjoyable compared to one that fits you better. It’s a night and day difference. You’ll have much more fun on the stick that fits you now.

We know the last thing you want to hear is that you’ll need to buy a size upgrade kit to turn your small into a medium, but if you can afford it, you should. Otherwise you might get the pogo stick and not enjoy it because you can’t really control it.

Durability

The footpegs are as strong as we can make them out of aluminum and the only people that really have issues with them breaking are the pros, who are constantly doing things like jumping over gaps and trying to do peg stalls. They also bail from 6′ high, and because the pegs stick out, they usually take the impact. With that kind of use they’re going to eventually break.

The only thing we can do to prevent that is make them out of steel, which would increase the weight from 3.1 lbs to around 5 lbs. Doing so would make it really difficult to maneuver the stick around – and the only people who would really benefit from those pegs are the exact people who would never use them.

Under normal usage, the pegs aren’t going to break unless there’s a manufacturing defect like and air bubble in the aluminum that weakens the material. On average, I’d say we send out 5-10 replacement pegs per year aside from the pros, which is totally reasonable to us, especially when they’re covered under the 1-year warranty.

This is an important one to understand.; we have good reason for it…

The more serious riders tend to push the limits with jumping high and doing tricks. Just about every big air trick involves taking your feet off of the pegs. People oftentimes perform a trick and put their feet back onto the pogo stick as they come in contact with the ground. That doesn’t provide much time for error.

If they happen to miss the pegs, there’s a chance they can smack their face on the top of the stick. The SofTop protective cover helps A LOT…but the handlebars don’t have much protection. Because of that, they’re designed to bend. It’s a fail safe for a worst case scenario. Yes, it sucks that they can bend. But the replacements are cheap. And we don’t want you getting hurt. We learned the hard way.

It’s possible, but it’s really unlikely. We only come across dented cylinders once or twice a year.

The SofTop protective cover and footpegs both stick out from the pogo stick, which (mostly) prevents the cylinder from coming into contact with the ground when dropped.

In most cases, dents occur under crazy circumstances…like the cylinder is dropped and lands on the corner of a stair.

The shaft is made from 1/8″ thick 301 stainless steel. It’s really difficult to bend.

From time to time the pros will bend a shaft, but they also use some customizes parts and longer than standard shafts, which weakens the design.

Unless you’re a crazy manic, you probably aren’t going to ever bend the shaft. This is something we rarely ever see happen.

You will possibly scratch the shaft, however. If you scratch the shaft, it can end up wearing down the bushing prematurely. If you happen to notice a scratch on the shaft, simply sand it down with some sandpaper.

Training

If you’ve bounced on a pogo stick before, you’ll pick up one of ours and get it down pretty quickly. Our pogo sticks have a longer stroke than you are used to, so there will be a little bit of an adjustment for you to get used to.
If you’ve never bounced on a pogo stick, you’ll definitely have a bit of a learning curve. Some people get on and bounce away without ever looking back. Others can bounce a few times and then jump off. The next time they bounce a few more times. Within 30-60 minutes most people can usually bounce indefinitely.
Here are things I typically tell people:

Wear a helmet at all times! Safety first!
Fill the pogo stick to about 1/4 body weight in PSI. If you’re 100 pounds, you should use about 25 PSI to start.
Put the center of your feet on the pegs (as opposed to the balls of your feet, which many people tend to do at first) and get your upper body over the top of the stick so that your shoulders sit above the handlebars. This will give you the best center of gravity.
Start jumping by pushing down with moderate pressure. Don’t force all your weight into it…you just want to get the pogo stick started. Once the pogo stick starts moving, it’ll be much easier to make it move more and more.
When you bounces, watch how much of the shaft is going into the stick. Only about half of it should be going into the stick in the beginning. If it’s only compressing 2″ it means the stick has too much air. If the whole shaft is sliding into the pogo stick, that means you’re spending too much time on the ground and will have trouble keeping your balance.
Perform maintenance every 4-6 weeks to make sure the lube isn’t getting all gummed up and slowing the pogo stick down. You want as little resistance as possible, and a dirty pogo stick will slow down significantly, making it much more difficult for you to bounce.
Finally, the pogo stick is meant to be thrown around. If you lose your balance, ditch the stick! The pogo stick might get its feelings hurt, but it’ll take a fall much better than you!

We recommend starting with 30% of your bodyweight in pounds per square inch (psi) for lbs or half your bodyweight in psi for kilograms. For example, if you weigh 150 pounds you should start with around 40-45 psi and work your way up or down from there. The more air you pump into your pogo stick the stiffer the air spring will become.

If you pump your pogo stick up to 45 psi and the pogo stick won’t budge or the pogo stick only moves 1-2″ up and down, that means you will need to reduce the air pressure to 40 psi. Play around with the it, and you’ll quickly find your preferred pressure.

When you get onto the pogo stick for the first time, you should compress the stroke about 5-6″ for optimal comfort and learning. If you are up 10″ or more of the stroke, that means you’re spending too much time on the ground and will more easily lose your balance. As you get better and can bounce higher, you will be able to use more of the stroke when bouncing.

The better you get, the more air pressure you will likely prefer.

Maintenance & Care

To clean the pogo stick:

Let all of the air out of the cylinder
Unscrew the bolts from the bottom and pull the entire peg assembly out of the pogo stick. I usually do this by holding the cylinder and slamming the tip on the ground. If you do that a few times the pegs should pop out of the cylinder. Step on the pegs and pull on the cylinder to get the peg assembly out of the cylinder.
Clean the piston and seal thoroughly with a rag or paper towel.
Inspect the o-ring on the piston to make sure there are no scratches. If there are, it should be replaced.
Hand tighten the piston as much as possible. It sometimes unscrews itself over time. If you have a thick rubber band, put that around the piston to get extra traction for screwing it on.
Wipe down the inside of the cylinder (we use an old sock or some rags tied to a broom handle—very high tech, I know). Clean the shock absorber, the shaft, and anything else that’s dirty.
Re-lubricate it by putting the lube inside the cylinder (above the breather holes, if possible) – Vaseline and Baby Oil Gel are typical favorites (I particularly like Baby Oil Gel because it’s a little thicker and makes your stick smell like a field of flowers). Another one that’s becoming popular is White Lithium Grease.
Pop the pegs back into the cylinder, and put it back together like so: finger tighten each bolt around the bottom so that all are lightly in place. Then tighten a bolt on one side. Flip the pogo stick around 180 and tighten the opposite side. Turn 90 degrees and repeat the process until all the screws are in place.
Fill the pogo stick to 40psi.
Set the seal by smacking the pogo stick down onto the bounce pad at an angle. At first, you might hear a few air puffs escaping. Rotate the pogo stick and repeat until no more air escapes.
Set the air pressure to your preferred bouncing pressure and get back on it.
Here’s a link to our Oil Change Tutorial

We recommend doing a full oil change every 4-5 times that you add lubricant or about every crapload of bounces (a crapload is like 2-3 months). Performing a full oil change takes approximately 10-15 minutes. If you bounce on the stick every single day or in places that are particularly dirty, you might want to do an oil change a little more frequently than we recommend (like every 6 weeks).
We recommend adding lubricant to your V4 about every few weeks to a couple of months depending on use. Doing so takes about 2 minutes and is really simple, so it’s probably better to lube more often than not since it will keep the bounce silky smooth for a longer period of time.

If you don’t lube the stick for a really long period of time (like a year or more) the o-ring might eventually wear down and need to be replaced. Not a big deal at all. More importantly, if you don’t add lube it’ll drain out of the stick or even turn into a sticky grease. Either way, the bounce will slow down and take a lot more effort. Keeping the stick lubed will make the ride much easier and more fun.

Manufacturing

Every single V4 we sell goes through a rigorous build, inspection, and testing process. Once the parts are manufactured in Southern California we ship them back to the warehouse where they are assembled by hand. We have more than 20 suppliers who we work closely with to manufacture or purchase parts from. Each of these manufacturers does a terrific job, which is why we are able to offer a 1-year warranty on the V4. Some of our parts (like the handlebar grips or bolts) are purchases from other companies. However, most of the parts we purchase are made specifically for us and then are welded, cut & drilled, or chamfered before being delivered.
We assemble every pogo stick ourselves. If we are not able to do so, we beg for help from friends and family. When we’re really lucky, we’re able to get a small group of local high school kids to help out for a few days, in which case we can build quite a few.

For the most part, however, everything is assembled in house…by us. We’ve built thousands of them, and we do the job right and we do it quickly – so for now, we’ll continue to keep building them by ourselves until we get to a point that we can’t…and then we’ll hire some more local groms to help out.